How it happened

How it happened

Just for posterity, here’s how Hurricane Dean came and went. Sunday 12th August: Tropical Depression 4 forms at 12N and 31W and though it’s way out in the Atlantic, it is forecast to slowly strengthen and head in our direction. I do my first panic buying. Monday 13th – Wednesday 15th: TD4 becomes Tropical Storm Dean. Given it’s westerly speed (a quick 20MPH) I work out it’ll pass over us Friday morning. The forecast path has it a little south of us, but it will be a hurricane by the time it reaches us. Thursday 16th: We’re now in a Hurricane Warning and people are sent home from work from the afternoon onwards. It’s announced the power will be cut at midnight, and water will go from around 10pm. Otherwise, it’s a normal morning in town. Friday 17th: By 6am the winds & rain wake me. I debate staying in bed, but decide to give the house a once-over. I am freaked out to look out of the front window and see the big nutmeg trees all toppled over. I decide its time to get serious so I dress fully including raincoat, and make sure my essentials bag (camera, change of clothes, passport etc) is very close at hand. I turn my small radio on to listen to local radio; the Roseau river is flooding, but specific facts are otherwise hard to come by. Noted the huge drop in pressure whenever I dared open the front door to venture out. Amazingly, the land lines are all working, but the cell service is ‘Emergency Only’. I wonder how that will...

Returning to normal

yellow warblerOriginally uploaded by Steve_Mc A week after Dean, I see the first Broad-winged Hawk since the storm. The smallest of birds – the hummingbirds, the Yellow Warbler – and the larger ones – heron, flycatcher, ani – were all back in evidence soon after the storm had passed. But the magnificent Hawk took it’s time. Actually, it was seeing a postman on Monday this week that I knew we were back to normal here...

Hurricane Tips

A week after Dean. The season is not yet at its peak. My limited internet access this last week has always started by looking at the Atlantic satellite image every day. A friend has some good tips for handling a storm here. I’d add: 1) If you’ve got a generator, make sure it’s working2) Unplug and bag all your computer equipment/electricals, and put somewhere safe – ideally off the floor but under a desk/table3) Save & store all the water you can, esp. drinking water.4) make sure the generator is working5) charge all your rechargeable batteries, inc. your cell phone. The electricity is always shut off just before the storm, and you can count on it not coming back for a couple of days. Even as of today there are still areas without. We were lucky to have had a full five days warning of Dean’s...

Dean +5

3pm – cell service restored. 7pm – electricity finally came back on. 10pm – a can of cold Draught Guinness was had.